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Inspired Art Photogaphy

 Film Buying Guide

PhotographyThe chart below will help you understand the many advantages and disadvantages of modern film. Unfortunately the use of film has declined sharply and we found very few buying guide sites. Finding and developing photographic film in this day of digital cameras can be tedious and time consuming. You might want to check the internet.
100 ISO-This film has low grain and sharpness qualities. It can be used in sunny outdoor as well flash photos. Good for sunny days and flash. Best used for close-ups, landscapes and posed Images photographs. Not recommended for action shooting such as sporting events. Can not be used for low existing light situations.
200 ISO-Similar to 100
400 ISO-Very versatile film for existing light and action photography.
Can be used effectively in stop action and night photography. Used by the pros in a wide variety of settings.
Limited in enlargement because of the grain. However Kodak and Fuji are developing new versions to overcome the limitations.
800 ISO-Film with a great deal of grain. To be used in very low light situations. Good for very low light, such as sporting events. Limited enlargement. Colors are not always true
1600 IS0-Very High  Grain. Good for extremely low light situations. Don't even think about enlargements.
Note: Grain are tiny dots of silver crystals that create the image. The higher the speed the further the grains are apart. If you try to enlarge a high speed film the subject looks as if it has brownish freckles. Good news the major film companies are producing high speed film with fine grains.
ISO stands for the speed of the film. The more sensitive the film the greater the ISO number.

The less sensitive the film the lower the ISO number. Most cameras today set the film number for you automatically. However if yours doesn't, check the speed on the film and adjust it accordingly on your camera.

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